BMX Racing:

The sport that’s coming
of age in India

Manish Dayal:

The Indian-origin actor carving a niche in Hollywood

Aditi Handa:

The Indian baker who’s building a ₹18 crore bread business

Deepa Mehta:

The Indo-Canadian filmmaker challenging stereotypes

Prabhdeep Singh:

The golden hour man revolutionizing India’s ambulance service

Sarita Choudhury:

How this Indian-origin actress wowed the West

Global Indian, A hero’s journey

We are an online publication that focuses on the journeys of Indians and Indian companies abroad

Global Indian, A hero’s journey

We are an online publication that focuses on the journeys of Indians and Indian companies abroad

BMX Racing:

The sport that’s coming of age in India

Manish Dayal:

The Indian-origin actor carving a niche in Hollywood

Aditi Handa:

The Indian baker who’s building a ₹18 crore bread business

Deepa Mehta:

The Indo-Canadian filmmaker challenging stereotypes

Prabhdeep Singh:

The golden hour man revolutionizing India’s ambulance service

Sarita Choudhury:

How this Indian-origin actress wowed the West

Global Indian | Good Reads

 Top reads curated from the internet 

#1
Where does India stand in the Indo-Pacific nuclear tinderbox?- Manoj Joshi
Reading Time: 8 mins
#2
The difference education makes to what the salaried earn in India: Vidya Mahambre, Sowmya Dhanraj
Reading Time: 6 min
#3
Quad tent just got bigger with AUKUS. China’s aggressive behaviour will be under watch: Rajesh Rajagopalan
Reading Time: 8 mins
#4
Climate change: Govt must strive for sustainability while ensuring food security – Neha Simlai and Soumya Singhal
Reading Time: 8 min
#5
The case for cryptocurrency to be outlawed until we regulate it: Madan Sabnavis
Reading Time: 8 mins
#6
When Virat Kohli resigned from the captaincy: Mukul Kesavan
Reading Time: 6 mins

Where does India stand in the Indo-Pacific nuclear tinderbox?- Manoj Joshi

(Manoj Joshi is a Distinguished Fellow, Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi. This column first appeared in The Quint on September 21, 2021)

  • The new Australia-UK-US (AUKUS) alliance is the latest warning of the looming threat of war in the Indo-Pacific region. In the middle of this month, we saw competing missile tests conducted by North and South Korea, there have been successive and deliberate intrusions into Taiwan’s Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAF), and, most recently, the Chinese have issued a veiled warning against India’s planned Agni-V missile test and have been spotted constructing hundreds of new silos to house their long-range nuclear armed missiles in Gansu and Inner Mongolia. The hostility between the US and China is no longer constrained. Within a week of telling Xi Jinping over the telephone on September 9 that the US wanted to maintain the “guardrails” on the relationship to ensure “competition does not veer into conflict”, the United States sharply escalated the situation by entering into a new security alliance on September 15. Though China was not mentioned, it is clear that the US aim is to pose a challenge to Chinese naval activity, especially in the southern Pacific Ocean.

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15 Reads

The difference education makes to what the salaried earn in India: Vidya Mahambre, Sowmya Dhanraj

(Vidya Mahambre is professor of economics at Great Lakes Institute of Management and Sowmya Dhanraj is assistant professor of economics at Madras School of Economics. The article was first published in Mint on September 21, 2021)  

  • Despite consistently rising unemployment, youngsters continue to invest in education because over their lifetime, they expect to earn more compared to people with low education. Educated workers may earn more not only because of education per se, but also because of other related traits such as superior abilities, ambition, diligence and better endowments like parental resources and status, all of which affect enrolment in higher education. Their earnings thus reflect a combination of these and other socio-economic factors. Nonetheless, how much more people with higher levels of educational attainment earn at the start of their career, and how their lifetime- earnings’ trajectory changes vis-à-vis those with lower educational levels, are vital to understand returns on education. To investigate gaps in the earnings of two groups—the college-educated versus others—we ideally need data on earnings over their working lifespan. In the absence of such time-series data for India, however, we have adopted a simple but suitable alternative method.

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15 Reads

Quad tent just got bigger with AUKUS. China’s aggressive behaviour will be under watch: Rajesh Rajagopalan

(Rajesh Rajagopalan is a professor in International Politics at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi. This column first appeared in The Print on September 20, 2021)

  • The latest trilateral arrangement in the Indo-Pacific – the Australia-United Kingdom-United States or AUKUS – is good news for both the Indo-Pacific and India. The Joe Biden administration, in quite a dramatic fashion, has put to rest any lingering questions about the United States’ willingness to play a global role. These questions were always somewhat unwarranted because there was little doubt that Washington would respond to the challenge posed by China in the Indo-Pacific. Despite many ideological differences, Biden had already doubled down on some key aspects of the Donald Trump administration’s foreign policy on competing with China. Nevertheless, Biden’s badly mismanaged troops withdrawal from Afghanistan also raised concerns about the US’ staying power and dependability. The AUKUS initiative, coming barely two weeks after the withdrawal, is further testament to the US’ commitment to its global role. Indeed, in retrospect, the withdrawal itself appears to be a planned refocus, disengaging from a fruitless fight that was sapping US strength so that it could redirect American attention to the much more important task of countering China...

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15 Reads

Climate change: Govt must strive for sustainability while ensuring food security – Neha Simlai and Soumya Singhal

(Neha Simlai is the Founding Director at Social and Political Research Foundation. Soumya Singhal is a Research Assistant at Social and Political Research Foundation. The column first appeared in The Quint on September 19, 2021)

  • With a clear “Code Red” for countries including India, the recently released Climate Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts frequent dry spells, heat waves, and irregular monsoonal rains over the next 30-40 years. What does that really mean? Effectively, climate change puts at risk India's food security while also compounding the issues related to import substitution, agricultural production as well as farmers’ livelihoods and incomes. The IPCC also posits that mean precipitation and monsoon extremes are projected to intensify by 20 percent in summer over India and South Asia, which would result in erratic water supply to largely rainfed agricultural areas...
 

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15 Reads

The case for cryptocurrency to be outlawed until we regulate it: Madan Sabnavis

(Madan Sabnavis is chief economist, Care Ratings and author of Hits & Misses: The Indian Banking Story. This column first appeared in Mint on September 19, 2021)

  • Gold has no intrinsic value, but its scarcity and acceptability have created a pricing mechanism for it. Theoretically, any stone of any colour found only in select regions that can be used as an ornament will gather value from scarcity and acceptability. The same is true of cryptocurrency. There are willing buyers and sellers of something that has come from out of the blue. The idea has gained strength with the government of El Salvador announcing that it holds Bitcoin. The corollary is that if a government believes in it, no one can be left out and its use may become a habit. Bitcoin, created by Satoshi Nakamoto, who has not yet been identified, is the most popular cryptocurrency. Despite its cryptic origin, Bitcoin is widely traded and a force to reckon with in financial markets. Other currencies have emerged with fancy names such as Ethereum, Litecoin and Dogecoin. While we may have to accept this wave, the broader question is whether they should be allowed to circulate...

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15 Reads

When Virat Kohli resigned from the captaincy: Mukul Kesavan

(Mukul Kesavan is an Indian historian and author. The column first appeared in NDTV on September 18, 2021)

  • Virat Kohli has resigned as captain from the wrong cricket code. On no account should he give up the captaincy of India's T20 team. Given his current Triple A rating (Aggressive Accumulator with Attitude), it isn't clear that he earns his place in that side. The Indian T20 team has more anchors than it needs and Kohli's probably a drag on the run-rate. But who cares? Asli T20 competition happens not in the World Cup but in the IPL which has the money, the talent and the needle. Bombay Desis or whatever it is that Mukesh Ambani's team is called, would beat the Indian national team nine times out of ten. The T20 World Cup doesn't count as a test of skill. Any half-decent side has a shot at winning the title; unlike a long league competition like the IPL where teams play each other over and over again, there aren't enough matches played in the World Cup to properly test the mettle of a side, to sort out the chancers from the genuine contenders.
 

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Global Indian | World in Numbers

Statistically speaking

Global Indian | Did You Know? 

Fun facts about India and Global Indians

GLOBAL INDIAN | PICTURES & VIDEOS

Your daily dose of visual media picked by our editorial team

Videos

  • Born and brought up in Hyderabad, Vani Kola moved to the US in 1985 for her higher studies and eventually worked in Silicon Valley for 22 years. By 2006, she was ready to move back to India as a venture capitalist, who has since given wings to several successful startups in the country. She believes the economic liberalization opened up a world of opportunities for India.
    Duration: 7 mins
  • It was with her 1997 novel The God of Small Things that Arundhati Roy exploded on the literary scene, and soon earned her very first Booker Prize. The 59-year-old author, who has been making the right noise with her work and social commentary, says it’s the job of a writer to tell what they think not as activists but as writers.
    Duration: 2 min
  • Indian percussionist Rashmi Bhatt has been creating waves in the global music fraternity with his collaborations with artistes like Sting and Shakira. Rooted in Indian culture, Bhatt considers himself a citizen of the world.
    Duration: 7 mins